Lab/Assignment Submission Guidelines

CSC 211 - Computer Organization and Architecture - Weinman



Summary:
We provide details on the policies for submitting course work.

Contents

1  Collaboration
2  Header
3  References and Academic Honesty Certification
4  Format
5  Submission

1  Collaboration

When you an assignment is to be completed individually, you must respect the course academic honesty policy.
When you work on lab and homework assignments with a randomly assigned partner; labs and assignments must be completed and submitted with these assigned partners.
Working with a partner will help ensure you can take some advantage of the principle that "Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow."1 Working with an assigned partner will increase the chances of being exposed to different ways of thinking and problem solving as well as help you practice the skills you'll need in the work world, where you do not typically get to choose your coworkers.
Everyone whose name appears on a submitted group lab report has the responsibility to ensure everyone fully understands the submission.
Other discussions must respect the course academic honesty policy.

2  Header

You would be surprised how often the wrong files are submitted; a common header makes it easier for everyone to quickly identify. The very beginning of each and every project file (including references) should contain the identifying line.
# Lab: Title
 
The lab or assignment title must exactly match that give on the corresponding web page. Even your circuit files should have text in the main circuit with this text prominently displayed!
DO NOT INCLUDE YOUR NAMES. Because your submissin will be graded anonymously, you must not place your name in any file except the references/honesty file, below.

3  References and Academic Honesty Certification

Each and every submission must include a single file, references.txt, with the following information (sources, help, certification) completed.
Lab: Title
 
Academic honesty certification:
  Written/online sources used:
    [include textbook(s), CSC 211 labs or readings;
     use complete citations for Web or other written sources;
     write none if no sources used]
  Help obtained
    [indicate names of instructor, class mentor
     or others, in accordance with class policy;
     write none if none of these sources used]
  Our initials below confirm that the above list of sources
  is complete AND that I/we have not talked to anyone else
  (e.g., CSC 211 students) about the solution to this problem
  Initials:  ABC, DEF

4  Format

All textual submission content must be in plain text files (note: source code is a text file), rather than special word processing or other document formats (e.g., .doc, .docx, .odp, .pdf). Logisim circuits will be submitted in files using its native .circ extension. MIPS assembly files will be submitted in
References
To facilitate blind grading, references and academic honesty must be included in a separate file, not included within any program files.
Content
A complete program should usually be given as a single entity (file), unless otherwise specified in the instructions. Multiple programs or Logisim circuits would be submitted in separate files.

5  Submission

Submit your files to the corresponding assignment on PioneerWeb by the deadline. Attach each file containing your answers (cf. 4) to upload. Type the complete e-mail addresses of all the individuals named on the lab into the Comments box. For example
starjane@grinnell.edu, cooljoe@grinnell.edu
(This will enable the graders to provide responses easily.)
Only one submission per project group is required. However, all group members are jointly responsible for ensuring a submission is made. For example, if your partner told you she/he/ze would submit the project but forgets to do so, all group members will incur late penalties. For this reason, I recommend submitting work while you are sitting together.

Acknowledgments

This is a derivative work of Detailed Coursework Instructions by Henry Walker; used under a CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0 license.
Copyright © 2012, 2014, 2015 Jerod Weinman.
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

Footnotes:

1This principle is dubbed Linus's Law by Eric S. Raymond in The Cathedral and the Bazaar, O'Reilly Media, 1999, p. 30.